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BBC Reports Saturated Fat Heart Disease ‘Myth’

Published on October 29, 2013,

More signs that the mainstream media is starting to question orthodox thinking with this report on the BBC of a cardiologist’s claims that saturated fat is being demonised…

BBC saturated fat mythThe risk from saturated fat in foods such as butter, cakes and fatty meat is being overstated and demonised, according to a cardiologist.

Dr Aseem Malhotra said there was too much focus on the fat with other factors such as sugar often overlooked.

It is time to “bust the myth of the role of saturated fat in heart disease”, he writes in an opinion piece in the British Medical Journal.

But the British Heart Foundation said there was conflicting evidence.

It added reducing cholesterol through drugs or other means does lower heart risk.

Studies on the link between diet and disease have led to dietary advice and guidelines on how much saturated fat, particularly cholesterol, it is healthy to eat.

Millions of people in the UK have been prescribed statins to reduce cholesterol levels.

Dr Malhotra, a cardiology registrar at Croydon University Hospital, London, says the “mantra that saturated fat must be removed to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease has dominated dietary advice and guidelines for almost four decades”.

He says saturated fat has been “demonised” and any link with heart disease is not fully supported by scientific evidence.

The food industry has compensated for lowering saturated fat levels in food by replacing it with sugar, he says, which also contributes to heart disease.

Adopting a Mediterranean diet – olive oil, nuts, oily fish, plenty of fruit and vegetables and a moderate amount of red wine – after a heart attack is almost three times as powerful in reducing mortality as taking a statin, writes Dr Malhotra.

However, Prof Peter Weissberg, medical director at the British Heart Foundation, says studies on the link between diet and disease frequently produce conflicting results…

More at:  Saturated fat heart disease ‘myth’

Obese men in their 20s are TWICE as likely to die in middle age than their slim peers

Published on May 7, 2013,

The UK’s Daily Mail has an article based on research published in the BMJ (formerly known as British Medical Journal) by Danish researchers which highlights the devastating health consequences of obesity in young men. Sadly, nothing is especially surprising but it surely begs the question that if the consequences of obesity are so serious (and in turn costly), why won’t health authorities and governments face up to the fact that they have given us the wrong nutritional advice for decades and start showing people how reducing sugar and carb intake can make a real difference? This is from the Daily Mail…

Picture of an Obese Teenager (146kg/322lb) wit...

Picture of an Obese Teenager (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Men who are obese in their early twenties are significantly less likely to live to reach middle age, according to a new study published in the BMJ.

They are also up to eight times more likely to suffer diabetes, potentially fatal blood clots or a heart attack.

It is well known that obesity in adulthood poses a risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, but previously it had not been clear whether obesity in early adulthood strengthens that risk.

Danish researchers tracked the health of 6,500 Danish 22-year-old men for 33 years up to the age of 55.

All the men were born in 1955 and had registered with the Military Board for a fitness test to gauge their suitability for military service.

All potential conscripts in Denmark are subjected to a battery of psychological and physical tests, including weight.

Over 80 per cent were within the normal range and five per cent were underweight.

One in 10 were overweight and just over one per cent – equating to 97 men -  were obese.

Normal weight is classified as a body mass index (BMI) of between 18.5 and 25; obesity is classified as a BMI of 30 or more.

Almost half of those classified as obese at the age of 22 were diagnosed with diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, blood clots in the legs or lungs, or had died before reaching the age of 55.

They were eight times more likely to get diabetes as their normal weight peers and four times as likely to get a potentially fatal blood clot.

They were also more than twice as likely to develop high blood pressure, have had a heart attack, or to have died.

Every unit increase in BMI corresponded to an increased heart attack rate of five per cent, high blood pressure and blood clot rates of 10 per cent, and an increased diabetes rate of 20 per cent.

In total, obese young men were three times as likely to get any of these serious conditions as their normal weight peers by middle age, conferring an absolute risk of almost 50 per cent compared with only 20 per cent among their normal weight peers.

The findings, published in the BMJ, have prompted researchers to warn that the continuing rise in obesity may counteract the fall in deaths from heart disease.

They said: ‘Obesity-related morbidity and mortality will, in decades to come, place an unprecedented burden on healthcare systems worldwide.’

More at: Obese men in their 20s are TWICE as likely to die in middle age than their slim peers

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