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Medical journal article reminds us of the fact that fruit juices very sugary indeed

Published on March 14, 2014,

Dr Briffa, on his blog, has an interesting post about fruit juices, drawing on recent research which suggests that consumers underestimate the amount of sugar in them, whilst overestimating the amount in drinks like colas (when in reality the levels are similar)…

Medical journal article reminds us of the fact that fruit juices very sugary indeedIn a meeting today, my companion asked me about my views on fruit and fruit juice. In short, my reply was that I think fruit is over-rated, and that fruit juice should generally be avoided. Many of the reasons for my ambivalence about fruit (and why much fruit is anything but some sort of nutritional nirvana) is, for me, well articulated in this blog post by nutritionist Zoe Harcombe. Personally, I do eat some fruit, but I don’t go out of my way to eat it either. My issue with fruit juice specifically concerns its very sugary nature. Only last month, our attention was drawn to this fact by a comment piece written in the journal Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology [1].

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WHO: Daily sugar intake ‘should be halved’

Published on March 6, 2014,

The media is reporting significant warnings from the World Health Organisation that children should not be given fizzy drinks because they contain dangerous amounts of sugar and adults should halve their average intake to six teaspoons a day to avoid obesity, heart disease and other serious illnesses…

WHO: Sugar intake ‘should be halved’People will be advised to halve the amount of sugar in their diet, under new World Health Organization guidance. The recommended sugar intake will stay at below 10% of total calorie intake a day, with 5% the target, says the WHO. The suggested limits apply to all sugars added to food, as well as sugar naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit concentrates. UK campaigners say it is a “tragedy” that the WHO has taken 10 years to think about changing its advice. The recommendation that sugar should account for no more than 10% of the calories in the diet, was passed in 2002.

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via Bbc

Better late than never!

New Zealand Asks If Fizzy Drinks Should Be Banned

Published on February 24, 2014,

New Zealand media outlet 3 News is reporting that a conference of public health specialists in is taking place in Auckland to discuss whether fizzy drinks should be banned (or at least taxed) with experts suggesting claim it such a move would save lives, curb obesity, diabetes, risk of stroke, cancers, and several other health issues….

Should fizzy drinks be banned?Should fizzy drinks be banned? Should fizzy drinks be banned? And should there be a fizzy drink tax? Next week a conference of public health specialists in Auckland will meet to discuss these questions. They claim it will save lives, curb obesity, diabetes, risk of stroke, cancers, and several other health issues. The American Heart Association say that the upper limit of sugar we should get each day is three teaspoons for children, six for women and nine for men, but New Zealand data suggests we get three times that amount, ingesting 30 teaspoons a day.

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via 3news

 

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